Category Archives: Applying to law school

Welcome to the LSAT Blog and Library of Best LSAT Blog Posts

My name is John Richardson. I live in Toronto, Canada. I am a lawyer and have been involved in Toronto LSAT preparation courses for many years (sometimes as a business and sometimes as a hobby). LSAT Canada is the same as the LSAT in most of the rest of the world. If you are looking for Toronto LSAT tutoring Toronto or Toronto LSAT prep courses please contact me.

Upcoming Toronto LSAT Course Dates:

October 3, 2015 LSAT

Two Weekend LSAT Prep Course Toronto:

August 1, 2, 8, 9/15

You have a lot at stake in both improving your LSAT score and maximizing your LSAT test score. You need to both:

Know what to do and be able to do what you know. You will have to train for the LSAT. Your training must include taking a large number of LSAT practice tests. (Obviously you must use actual LSAT prep tests for this purpose).

LSAT preparation has evolved over the years. In many ways, it is almost “open source”. The rise of social media sites (Facebook, Myspace, discussion boards, internet LSAT study groups, etc.),  has made LSAT preparation very much a group activity. There  is no one company, tutor or approach that is the right way to prepare for the LSAT. All courses and tutors have their strengths and weaknesses and make helpful contributions to  LSAT preparation and law admissions. My goal is for  this site to feature  the contributions  of LSAT teachers who are willing to share particularly helpful thoughts.

I originally  created this site because of the the number of questions I received about “the best LSAT prep books, etc). I will post my thoughts on LSAT preparation. I will sometimes reference other sites. I also maintain a library of the best  LSAT blog posts.

Although the number of  LSAT takers is declining in North America, LSAT is expanding internationally.  The LSAT has always been used for applicants to law schools in Canada. In fact,  LSAT Canada is a big  headache in the lives of Canadian pre-law students.  It is now used for certain law schools in Australia and New Zealand. A special version – LSAT India – has been created.

Please make sure that you have a look at all the pages and links on this site. If you have a site that you would like to be added to the links (no guarantee) please email me.

Also, if you have a specific question that you would like me to try to answer (LSAT or otherwise), either post a comment here or send me an email:

prelawforum at gmail dot com

Finally, I would like to invite LSAT teachers, LSAT test takers or anybody else with an interest (can’t imagine who that might be) to contribute to this blog. You can do this in two ways:

1. By posting a comment on specific pages;

2. By suggesting additional links;

3. By actually writing “guest posts”

All are welcome and encouraged!

John Richardson

#LSAT PREP and Life PREP – Correlation vs. causation

 

 

Thoughts on LSAT Improvement: 67th to 88th percentile

 

The decline in LSATs administered is irrelevant to law school applicants

When my ship came in, I was at the airport.

 

 

 

 

Last week the New York Times featured a story focusing on a drop in the number of LSATs administered. The article noted that:

The Law School Admission Council reported that the LSAT was given 129,925 times in the 2011-12 academic year. That was well off the 155,050 of the year before and far from the peak of 171,514 in the year before that. In all, the number of test takers has fallen by nearly 25 percent in the last two years

I read this with great amusement. In the 1997-98 cycle the number of LSATs administered fell to as low as 104,000. That’s approximately 25% less than the current number!  This is why it is dangerous to look at too small of a sample. But, speaking of statistics … Continue reading

LSAT India, Australia, New Zealand and Asia

The LSAT Goes International

“Dan Bernstine, president of the LSAC, said: “The Law School Admission Test has been used very successfully in the US and Canada for over 60 years. Interest in using the test for law school admission has spread to Australia, Japan, Korea, China, and countries in Eastern Europe. We are very excited about the opportunity to adapt this excellent tool in a way that will be useful for assessing the critical thinking skills of applicants to law programs in India.”

http://www.indiaprwire.com/pressrelease/education/2009030921134.htm

The Necessity of LSAT Growth  – Declining  Revenues and A Franchise Under Attack!

The simple fact is that LSAT is a business. The conventional view about business is that “it is either growing or dying.” It is clear that LSAT revenues are under attack  in North America. The reasons include:

– a major decline in the number  of applicants to law school. A law degree  is no longer seen as an automatic ticket to the “middle class”. Furthermore, there is the question of graduating with too much law school debt

decline in the number  of LSAT test takers as a result of fewer applicants to law school

– the ABA is reconsidering the question of whether to require “a valid and reliable admissions test” (not that the requirement of a test is NOT the same as a requirement of  the LSAT). In other words,  it is possible  that the LSAT will not be required for  law admissions.

– Even if a “valid and reliable admission test” continues to be required, there may be substitutes for the LSAT. After all,  the GRE has successfully targeted  the GMAT market. Many applicants  to MBA programs  now consider the GMAT vs. GRE question. The question of using the GRE as an alternative to the LSAT should be considered by law schools who want to  be more applicant friendly. There are question formats that both have and do overlap with the LSAT question formats. Foir example LSAT Logic Games and the GRE Analytical section overlapped  during the 1990s. LSAT Reading Comprehension is similar  to  GRE Reading Comprehension questions. Continue reading

Why Buying LSAT Commercial Guides is Like Throwing Money Away

Why Buying LSAT Commercial Guides is Like Throwing Money Away

By:  Kyle Pasewark, President

–Advise-In Solutions

I’m pleased to contribute to John Richardson’s Best LSAT books and courses blog, which provides a valuable forum for views about the LSAT.  After reading my blog (www.adviseinsolutionsblog.com) and looking at the Advise-In Solutions website (www.advisein.com),  John asked me to say a little about what, if any, LSAT preparation commercial publications and materials are valuable.

I have short answer and a long answer.  The short answer:  none, except the LSAT prep tests available through lsac.org.  Exams, not guides.

Now for the longer answer.  Before I took the LSAT, scoring a perfect 180 on my first and only try, I did what a diligent guy like me does.  I took a diagnostic test (on which I got a middling score).  So, I figured I needed help and bought every commercial guide I could.  I came home confident that these would show me the way to LSAT (and law school) promised land.  Then I opened them and my heart sank.   Each one was more technical and jargon-y that the last.  None of them presented a consistent, pedagogically sound perspective on the LSAT.  At the time, I was a college professor and knew something about how information is communicated effectively.  None of them (except for part of one, which is now outdated) did that, either.  What’s more, they presented far too many possible techniques and approaches, and I knew that, come LSAT exam day, this complexity would not only not help me get my best score, but prevent it. Continue reading

The LSAT and Blind (Visually Impaired) applicants

The LSAT and Blind Students – An Issue of Access and Fairness

Prologue:

http://www.mercurynews.com/bay-area-new … source=rss

Fisher: Blind law school grad can see injustice

”Being blind didn’t keep Stephanie Enyart from graduating from Stanford University. It didn’t keep her from earning a law degree at UCLA. And she’s determined not to let it keep her from practicing law.”

http://www.lawstudents.ca/forums/viewtopic.php?f=27&t=22655

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During the last few years, I have had contact with several law school applicants who are blind. In fact, I have a blind student planning to take my LSAT class this summer. Every time I have this request, I think: surely this cannot be a unique situation. There must be (numerically) many blind students who want to study law. How do they take the LSAT? How do they prepare for the LSAT? How can any law school in its right mind insist that a blind (or is the correct term “visually impaired” person – I am more interested in helping the student than with the politically correct term) student take the LSAT?  Even if one did take the LSAT, how could the score possibly be compared to that of other applicants? Continue reading

Logical Reasoning: The Dangers of Over-Categorization

Logical Reasoning: The Dangers of Over-Categorization

Is bucketing questions worth your time?

Is bucketing logical reasoning questions worth your time?

By John Rood, President of Next Step Test Preparation

One thing that continually amazes me each time I review an LSAT prep book is the huge amount of space spent in categorizing and sub-categorizing question types in logical reasoning. I just flipped through a 2009-edition prep book from one of the big national LSAT prep companies, and it literally had 2 pages devoted to finding assumptions in logical reasoning but over 20 pages explaining each different question type. I can also tell you from experience that categorization is a big part of the curriculum in large LSAT classes.

I think that the big prep companies do this for three reasons. Continue reading