Category Archives: LSAT reading comprehension

LSAT reading comprehension

Welcome to the LSAT Blog and Library of Best LSAT Blog Posts

My name is John Richardson. I live in Toronto, Canada. I am a lawyer and have been involved in Toronto LSAT preparation courses for many years (sometimes as a business and sometimes as a hobby). LSAT Canada is the same as the LSAT in most of the rest of the world. If you are looking for Toronto LSAT tutoring Toronto or Toronto LSAT prep courses please contact me.

Upcoming Toronto LSAT Course Dates:

October 3, 2015 LSAT

Two Weekend LSAT Prep Course Toronto:

August 1, 2, 8, 9/15

You have a lot at stake in both improving your LSAT score and maximizing your LSAT test score. You need to both:

Know what to do and be able to do what you know. You will have to train for the LSAT. Your training must include taking a large number of LSAT practice tests. (Obviously you must use actual LSAT prep tests for this purpose).

LSAT preparation has evolved over the years. In many ways, it is almost “open source”. The rise of social media sites (Facebook, Myspace, discussion boards, internet LSAT study groups, etc.),  has made LSAT preparation very much a group activity. There  is no one company, tutor or approach that is the right way to prepare for the LSAT. All courses and tutors have their strengths and weaknesses and make helpful contributions to  LSAT preparation and law admissions. My goal is for  this site to feature  the contributions  of LSAT teachers who are willing to share particularly helpful thoughts.

I originally  created this site because of the the number of questions I received about “the best LSAT prep books, etc). I will post my thoughts on LSAT preparation. I will sometimes reference other sites. I also maintain a library of the best  LSAT blog posts.

Although the number of  LSAT takers is declining in North America, LSAT is expanding internationally.  The LSAT has always been used for applicants to law schools in Canada. In fact,  LSAT Canada is a big  headache in the lives of Canadian pre-law students.  It is now used for certain law schools in Australia and New Zealand. A special version – LSAT India – has been created.

Please make sure that you have a look at all the pages and links on this site. If you have a site that you would like to be added to the links (no guarantee) please email me.

Also, if you have a specific question that you would like me to try to answer (LSAT or otherwise), either post a comment here or send me an email:

prelawforum at gmail dot com

Finally, I would like to invite LSAT teachers, LSAT test takers or anybody else with an interest (can’t imagine who that might be) to contribute to this blog. You can do this in two ways:

1. By posting a comment on specific pages;

2. By suggesting additional links;

3. By actually writing “guest posts”

All are welcome and encouraged!

John Richardson

#LSAT PREP and Life PREP – Correlation vs. causation

 

 

Why Reading Comprehension is Underemphasized in LSAT Prep, and What You Can Do about It

Guest Post by Kyle Pasewark of Advise In Solutions

A few weeks ago, I spoke with John Richardson, who teaches LSAT prep in Toronto, about doing a blog post for our sites on why most LSAT prep courses—and their marketing material—tend to underemphasize reading comprehension.

Things have been a little busy lately, but sometimes delay is a good thing.  In this case, it allowed me to have lunch with Elise Jaffe, a former law firm colleague who is now the pre-law advisor at Hunter College in New York City.  Elise and John are always insightful and, while this post is my view, it owes a lot to those conversations.

There are several reasons why reading comp seems to be the forgotten stepchild in LSAT prep courses and marketing.  Some of them are merely commercial; others are inherent in the relatively short-term nature of LSAT prep, which is to say that most programs don’t address reading comprehension very well because—within the structure of most LSAT prep programs—it’s harder to address.  In combination with the limited objectives of most LSAT programs, the result is that reading comprehension feels like an afterthought.

To read the complete article click here.

Why Buying LSAT Commercial Guides is Like Throwing Money Away

Why Buying LSAT Commercial Guides is Like Throwing Money Away

By:  Kyle Pasewark, President

–Advise-In Solutions

I’m pleased to contribute to John Richardson’s Best LSAT books and courses blog, which provides a valuable forum for views about the LSAT.  After reading my blog (www.adviseinsolutionsblog.com) and looking at the Advise-In Solutions website (www.advisein.com),  John asked me to say a little about what, if any, LSAT preparation commercial publications and materials are valuable.

I have short answer and a long answer.  The short answer:  none, except the LSAT prep tests available through lsac.org.  Exams, not guides.

Now for the longer answer.  Before I took the LSAT, scoring a perfect 180 on my first and only try, I did what a diligent guy like me does.  I took a diagnostic test (on which I got a middling score).  So, I figured I needed help and bought every commercial guide I could.  I came home confident that these would show me the way to LSAT (and law school) promised land.  Then I opened them and my heart sank.   Each one was more technical and jargon-y that the last.  None of them presented a consistent, pedagogically sound perspective on the LSAT.  At the time, I was a college professor and knew something about how information is communicated effectively.  None of them (except for part of one, which is now outdated) did that, either.  What’s more, they presented far too many possible techniques and approaches, and I knew that, come LSAT exam day, this complexity would not only not help me get my best score, but prevent it. Continue reading

New Book of 10 LSATs Finally Here – March 1, 2011

When you prepare for the LSAT it is essential to use actual LSAT questions. The individual test books are available for purchase from LSAT. The most economical way to purchase the tests is in books of 10. At the present time LSAT has released:

– 10 Actual LSATs  (Tests 9 – 18)

– 10 More Actual LSATs (Tests 19 – 28)

– The Next 10  Actual LSATs (Tests 29 – 38)

In September 2009, I blogged that LSAT would be releasing a new book of 10 LSATs.

The wait is over – just in time for you to prepare for the June 6, 2011 LSAT. I just receive an email from Amazon announcing that on March 1, 2011, LSAT will  be releasing:

Ten New Actual Official LSAT PrepTests with Comparative Readings

This book will be essential for your LSAT Preparation.

I have just confirmed with Law Services that it will consist of PrepTests 52 – 61. These are the LSAT tests from September 2007 – October 2010.  You may recall that LSAT comparative reading debuted in June 2007. The June 2007 LSAT is available as a free download from Law Services.