The decline in LSATs administered is irrelevant to law school applicants

When my ship came in, I was at the airport.

 

 

 

 

Last week the New York Times featured a story focusing on a drop in the number of LSATs administered. The article noted that:

The Law School Admission Council reported that the LSAT was given 129,925 times in the 2011-12 academic year. That was well off the 155,050 of the year before and far from the peak of 171,514 in the year before that. In all, the number of test takers has fallen by nearly 25 percent in the last two years

I read this with great amusement. In the 1997-98 cycle the number of LSATs administered fell to as low as 104,000. That’s approximately 25% less than the current number!  This is why it is dangerous to look at too small of a sample. But, speaking of statistics … Continue reading

LSAT Prep Books – They all use real LSAT questions now

I started this blog a few years ago. There have always been lots of LSAT books. In the beginning LSAT books consisted of “made up” LSAT questions. Now, it appears that LSAT books are based only on real LSAT questions. There is no longer a market for a book that is NOT based on real questions. Given that LSAT questions are available for purchase by anyone, the question becomes:

What is the value of “third party” (books that don’t come directly from LSAT)  prep books?

It seems to me that there are three “possible” values to them (and I use the word “possible”).

1. Some books include questions that are no longer available for direct purchase from LSAT. For the most part this would mean the first six PrepTests.

2. All of the third party books appear to group the actual LSAT questions by category. For example, parallel reasoning. grouping logic games, etc. This may or may not be a benefit. I have found that the categorization of LSAT questions is not helpful to everybody and it can be dangerous to some.

3. Commentary and explanations – It is interesting that there are a number of books containing actual questions that do NOT include commentary and explanations. I would consider this fact when making the purchase decision.

The State of The LSAT Prep Industry:

Live LSAT Preparation:

LSAT preparation is based on a common pool of questions. Therefore, you should be looking for the best  LSAT prep course instructor or tutor available in your area.

Online LSAT Preparation:

Interesting to me that Knewton is no longer doing LSAT prep. I thought they were on to something. Would welcome your comments about your experience with online LSAT prep.

 

Knewton no longer offering LSAT course

This is interesting. Apparently Knewton discontinued LSAT preparation (at least live classes) on February 14, 2012. My impression was the Knewton was definitely one of the better online LSAT courses. Does this mean that online LSAT is not popular? Does it mean that the LSAT course business is saturated?

http://www.knewton.com/lsat

Thanks for stopping by.

Unfortunately, we’re no longer offering the Knewton LSAT course.

Over the past 3 years, Knewton has helped thousands of students achieve their goal LSAT scores—and get one step closer to the law school of their dreams.

But now, we’re taking a step back from the LSAT in order to bring our technology to the world.

We’ve created the Adaptive Learning Platform™ to transform educational content into a personalized experience for each learner. We’re currently partnering with publishers, schools, developers, and media companies to deliver personalized instruction on a large scale. Focusing on these new opportunities properly means giving up other things we want to do, and that now includes taking new customers in our LSAT Live course.

Thanks again for your interest in Knewton. Stay tuned! Become a Facebook fan, follow us on Twitter, or check out our blog for more.

LSAT India, Australia, New Zealand and Asia

The LSAT Goes International

“Dan Bernstine, president of the LSAC, said: “The Law School Admission Test has been used very successfully in the US and Canada for over 60 years. Interest in using the test for law school admission has spread to Australia, Japan, Korea, China, and countries in Eastern Europe. We are very excited about the opportunity to adapt this excellent tool in a way that will be useful for assessing the critical thinking skills of applicants to law programs in India.”

http://www.indiaprwire.com/pressrelease/education/2009030921134.htm

The Necessity of LSAT Growth  – Declining  Revenues and A Franchise Under Attack!

The simple fact is that LSAT is a business. The conventional view about business is that “it is either growing or dying.” It is clear that LSAT revenues are under attack  in North America. The reasons include:

– a major decline in the number  of applicants to law school. A law degree  is no longer seen as an automatic ticket to the “middle class”. Furthermore, there is the question of graduating with too much law school debt

decline in the number  of LSAT test takers as a result of fewer applicants to law school

– the ABA is reconsidering the question of whether to require “a valid and reliable admissions test” (not that the requirement of a test is NOT the same as a requirement of  the LSAT). In other words,  it is possible  that the LSAT will not be required for  law admissions.

– Even if a “valid and reliable admission test” continues to be required, there may be substitutes for the LSAT. After all,  the GRE has successfully targeted  the GMAT market. Many applicants  to MBA programs  now consider the GMAT vs. GRE question. The question of using the GRE as an alternative to the LSAT should be considered by law schools who want to  be more applicant friendly. There are question formats that both have and do overlap with the LSAT question formats. Foir example LSAT Logic Games and the GRE Analytical section overlapped  during the 1990s. LSAT Reading Comprehension is similar  to  GRE Reading Comprehension questions. Continue reading

LSAT Tutors – How To Choose Them – How To Use Them

This is an excerpt from an article about Toronto  LSAT Tutoring.

LSAT Tutor(s) and LSAT Tutoring

Most  people associate  with tutoring with two ideas.

First, that by using a tutor they will have a one-on-one (or private) session. This may or may not be true. Some tutoring sessions operate  with small groups. We  have made  some effort to organize “small group” tutoring sessions that  focus on specific LSAT question types. Many LSAT test takers actually benefit from  having another student in the discussion. In general, “LSAT tutoring” will be in an environment with fewer students that you will find in “Live LSAT Preparation Courses”. Continue reading

Why Reading Comprehension is Underemphasized in LSAT Prep, and What You Can Do about It

Guest Post by Kyle Pasewark of Advise In Solutions

A few weeks ago, I spoke with John Richardson, who teaches LSAT prep in Toronto, about doing a blog post for our sites on why most LSAT prep courses—and their marketing material—tend to underemphasize reading comprehension.

Things have been a little busy lately, but sometimes delay is a good thing.  In this case, it allowed me to have lunch with Elise Jaffe, a former law firm colleague who is now the pre-law advisor at Hunter College in New York City.  Elise and John are always insightful and, while this post is my view, it owes a lot to those conversations.

There are several reasons why reading comp seems to be the forgotten stepchild in LSAT prep courses and marketing.  Some of them are merely commercial; others are inherent in the relatively short-term nature of LSAT prep, which is to say that most programs don’t address reading comprehension very well because—within the structure of most LSAT prep programs—it’s harder to address.  In combination with the limited objectives of most LSAT programs, the result is that reading comprehension feels like an afterthought.

To read the complete article click here.