Tag Archives: lsat reading comprehension

LSAT Explanations — PrepTest 61 — Free PDF – Guest Post

What follows is a guest post from John Rood of Next Step Test Prep.

See below for free explanations to LSAT PrepTest 61

Until now, it has been difficult for students to get high-quality explanations to a lot of LSAT questions. The LSAC’s SuperPrep book has complete explanations, but to only 3 tests (and those tests are very old). Students who take prep courses have gotten these materials for years, but prep companies have wisely kept their most helpful material for their $1,000+ prep courses rather than their $15 off-the-shelf books.

Next Step Test Preparation has released complete explanations for 10 of the most recent LSAT Preptests (52-61). These are the tests contained in LSAC’s 10 New Actual Official LSAT PrepTests” book. (You’ll need that book to get any value out of our explanations — but you should have that book anyway as it’s the cheapest source of recent exams).

However, some students will get dramatically better score increases from explanations than others. Here are the right and wrong ways to use LSAT explanations:

Wrong way: read a LSAT question, then read the explanation, then read the next question, etc. This approach assures that you don’t actually attempt the questions and are probably not internalizing either the patterns on the exam nor your own strengths and weaknesses.

Right way: Take a full, timed practice test. (You should be doing this at least 1-2 times per weeks). Then, after you’ve completed the full test, correct it. Look at every question you missed and figure out why you missed it. Then, and only then, look at the explanation.

The right way assures that you’re making your best effort to get everything right, then applying what you know on questions you missed, then, finally, looking at a professional explanation to crystallize that lesson in your mind.

Free LSAT Explanations

For LSAT Books readers, we’ve made available complete explanations for PrepTest 61, completely free. Keep in mind that you’ll also need PrepTest 61 from the LSAC — the test questions aren’t printed in our book.

Download Explanations (Opens PDF)

If you find this resource helpful, the complete book is available for purchase here: http://promos.nextsteptestprep.com/explanations-check-out/

Next Step Test Preparation provides complete courses of one-on-one LSAT tutors for about the price of a crowded lecture-style prep course. Email us or call 888-530-NEXT (6398) for a complimentary consultation.

Why Reading Comprehension is Underemphasized in LSAT Prep, and What You Can Do about It

Guest Post by Kyle Pasewark of Advise In Solutions

A few weeks ago, I spoke with John Richardson, who teaches LSAT prep in Toronto, about doing a blog post for our sites on why most LSAT prep courses—and their marketing material—tend to underemphasize reading comprehension.

Things have been a little busy lately, but sometimes delay is a good thing.  In this case, it allowed me to have lunch with Elise Jaffe, a former law firm colleague who is now the pre-law advisor at Hunter College in New York City.  Elise and John are always insightful and, while this post is my view, it owes a lot to those conversations.

There are several reasons why reading comp seems to be the forgotten stepchild in LSAT prep courses and marketing.  Some of them are merely commercial; others are inherent in the relatively short-term nature of LSAT prep, which is to say that most programs don’t address reading comprehension very well because—within the structure of most LSAT prep programs—it’s harder to address.  In combination with the limited objectives of most LSAT programs, the result is that reading comprehension feels like an afterthought.

To read the complete article click here.

New Book of 10 LSATs Finally Here – March 1, 2011

When you prepare for the LSAT it is essential to use actual LSAT questions. The individual test books are available for purchase from LSAT. The most economical way to purchase the tests is in books of 10. At the present time LSAT has released:

– 10 Actual LSATs  (Tests 9 – 18)

– 10 More Actual LSATs (Tests 19 – 28)

– The Next 10  Actual LSATs (Tests 29 – 38)

In September 2009, I blogged that LSAT would be releasing a new book of 10 LSATs.

The wait is over – just in time for you to prepare for the June 6, 2011 LSAT. I just receive an email from Amazon announcing that on March 1, 2011, LSAT will  be releasing:

Ten New Actual Official LSAT PrepTests with Comparative Readings

This book will be essential for your LSAT Preparation.

I have just confirmed with Law Services that it will consist of PrepTests 52 – 61. These are the LSAT tests from September 2007 – October 2010.  You may recall that LSAT comparative reading debuted in June 2007. The June 2007 LSAT is available as a free download from Law Services.

 

LSAT Logic Games Webinar- Law Services – Lori Davis

I highly recommend that you visit  “discoverlaw.org”. It is either run by or in conjunction with the Law School Admission Council (the people who brought you the LSAT).

On Thursday April 28, 2010, Discoverlaw.org conducted  an  “LSAT Prep Webinar” about how to prepare for the Analytical Reasoning (Logic Games) portion of the LSAT.

It was conducted by Lori Davis, who is a senior test specialist at LSAT. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time that LSAT has run a seminar dedicated to LSAT preparation. As a long time, LSAT prep class teacher, I was interested to hear what LSAT says about its own test.  I was treated to one hour of  “LSAT on the LSAT”. It was interesting. I made notes and decided to put those notes on my LSAT blog and social media sites. What follows is a summary of the Webinar (both the information given and the my impressions of it) for the benefit of those who were unable to attend. Discoverlaw.org will be running more LSAT prep Webinars. Continue reading